Squares of the Impending

For the past several weeks our Major Studio class has been exploring the “Zone of the Impending”, a section of the Translife exhibit hosted by MediartChina.

For the past several weeks our Major Studio class has been exploring the “Zone of the Impending”, a section of the Translife exhibit hosted by MediartChina.

Taken from the Translife statement, Zone of the Impending, “…brings into focus concerns about ecosystems and environments upon which all life depends, calling attention to the plight of ecological disruption through creative inspirations via artists’ great imaginations and ingenious strategies to engage us actively in environmental protection and in the reconstitution of a healthy ecosphere, thereby advocating for a new consciousness of shared responsibility and citizen participation.”

We were assigned to come up with personal responses to this idea. Anything from gallery pieces that call attention to these factors to practical solutions to problems of waste, pollution, consumption, etc. After breaking into groups of 3 we chose one idea as a group to develop over the course of two weeks.

Myself and my group members Conor Russomanno and Jason Moran, began work on a board game that we would eventually dub, “Squares of the Impending”

The game came out of dozens of conversations between our group, covering what philosophical realizations we wanted the user to come away with, the actual game mechanics, and the overall look and feel of the game itself. Though there are a number of game mechanic elements that need to be ironed out through another phase of game testing, the current experience of the game follows almost exactly to what we had intended. Players build out their developments with abstract pieces, while being forced to lay down rough tiles that are unusable. Eventually the end of the board is reached, but the rough tiles continue to be placed, causing an inward collapse of the board and the players pieces. Initially there is a strong sense of competition to obtain as much space as possible, but as players cut off their own section of the board they realize quickly that they are now competing against this inward movement, one that they created themselves.

Kellen Gallery

While studying at Parsons I worked as a gallery technician at the award-winning Sheila Johnson Design Center. I helped build the exhibition and worked with the artists to ensure that the specific requirements were met for exhibiting their work.

While studying at Parsons I worked as a gallery technician at the award-winning Sheila Johnson Design Center. I helped build the exhibition and worked with the artists to ensure that the specific requirements were met for exhibiting their work. This included numerous video, sound, and interactive installations.

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Synth Experiments

In college I messed around quite a bit with Reason. I used it to create the soundtrack for Pact Lunch and a bunch of other little clips for various video projects…

In college I messed around quite a bit with Reason. I used it to create the soundtrack for Pact Lunch and a bunch of other little clips for various video projects. Most of those ideas came out of a creative challenge I gave myself. I had to wait until I was just about to fall asleep, and then fire up Reason and record any idea until I collapsed at my desk.

Three of the tracks I’m most proud of from that period attached here:

Git Aliases

It’s been my experience that with most new things you learn, even if it’s a gradual process, there’s a distinct moment when it all clicks. I can remember…

It’s been my experience that with most new things you learn, even if it’s a gradual process, there’s a distinct moment when it all clicks. I can remember sitting on the couch running git commands from the terminal to revert my work and just marveling at how cool it felt.

That wore off pretty quickly, and after typing git status for the 16,423,325th time I decided I was ready to commit (ha) to some git aliases.

For the first 5 I settled on the ones I use the most: status, push, pull, log, and of course commit. Creating the aliases was actually simpler than I had imagined when I first heard it was a thing. Just typing each of these lines one at a time and you’ll have all you need to get up and running.

git config --global alias.st status
git config --global alias.ps push
git config --global alias.p  pull
git config --global alias.lo "log --oneline"
git config --global alias.ca "commit -am"

After having used those for a few days I Googled around a bit to see how other people were using them. As with most things git and bash, there are infinite rabbit holes to go down. This article in particular made me realize there’s still plenty to learn that’s way over my head. I did grab one from that site that I liked, to print out all the aliases I have on the global space, as I’m sure I’ll start to forget them occasionally as list grows:

git config --global alias.la "!git config -l | grep alias | cut -c 7-"

I actually had an issue just pasting that one into Terminal, something to do with the ! getting escaped maybe? You can open the file where these are actually getting saved by running open $HOME/.gitconfig which has all the global git settings. Pasting the quoted portion after the la fixed the issue for me so I can now run git la to print out the list of aliases.

Batch rotation for video files

I recently had a collection of videos I wanted to start editing that needed to be rotated by 180 degrees because they were originally shot on a Redrock lens that flips the image upside down.

I recently had a collection of videos I wanted to start editing that needed to be rotated by 180 degrees because they were originally shot on a Redrock lens that flips the image upside down. The files were all uncompressed movs so I wanted a way to also convert everything to mp4 in one step.

In days past I would open up Premiere and make a new sequence for each one, rotate the video by hand, and then render it out with the same name in a different directory. The process was always a bit daunting because there were several dozen and I always assumed there would be a better way to do it.

There is!

#!/bin/bash
# by Nate Rudolph
# Uses ffmpeg to rotate a collection of videos (mov) by 180 degrees

# Loop through all movs in current directory
for vid in *.mov ; do

  # Create variable for new filename with new extension
  newfilename=${vid%.*}_r.mp4

  # Use original video as input, rotate by PI (180 degrees), save as new file
  ffmpeg -i $vid -vf "rotate=PI:bilinear=0" $newfilename

done

(Link on Github)

This assumes you have ffmpeg installed, which can be done relatively easily with something like Homebrew. Check out this link if none of that makes sense.

Enjoy!